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MANILA: Philippines “First Daughter” Sara Duterte has been in lockstep with her father, following him into law and succeeding him as a city mayor. Now, she’s leading the race to replace Rodrigo Duterte as president.

So far, the feisty politician, who once punched a court sheriff in front of TV cameras, has rejected calls to seek the country’s highest office, insisting she wants to serve another term as Davao city mayor.

Supporters have plastered “Run Sara Run” posters and tarpaulins across the archipelago nation, held rallies and posted thousands of messages urging the 43-year-old to change her mind.

In a cryptic Facebook post on Saturday — the day after the deadline for registering as a candidate — Sara thanked her supporters who turned up at the Manila registration site for national positions, including president.

“Although I was not at the Sofitel (hotel), you did not lose hope and patience during the wait,” she said, hours before her office announced she had tested positive for COVID-19. “For this I offer my heartfelt thanks.”

The elder Duterte has not named a successor, but indicated recently Sara would run alongside his longtime aide Senator Christopher Go.

While Sara missed Friday’s closing date, analysts say she has until November 15 to make a late entry into the presidential race — like her father did in 2015.

Sara, known for her quick temper and fondness for big motorbikes, was in first place in the latest Pulse Asia poll of voter preferences for president.

She was followed by Ferdinand Marcos Jr., the son and namesake of a former dictator, celebrity mayor Francisco Domagoso and boxing legend Manny Pacquiao.

All except Sara have declared they will run for the top job.

Sara entered politics in 2007, serving three years as vice mayor while her father was mayor of Davao — the family stronghold on the southern island of Mindanao.

They swapped positions for the next three years and she again succeeded him as mayor in 2016 when he won the presidency.

Some doubt Sara’s support in the polls will translate into election victory, saying she lacks the charisma and humor of her father — key traits in a country where personality trumps policy.

“She’s drawing strength because she’s the daughter of the president,” Pulse Asia research director Ana Maria Tabunda said.

“I don’t think Sara Duterte will be a puppet or proxy of her father,” said political analyst Richard Heydarian.

“She’s a very spirited person, she has her own mind, she has her own base, she has her own team and has a very different approach to governance to her father.”

Sara would “try to strike her own course” on policies, including the anti-narcotics crackdown and relations with superpowers China and the United States, Heydarian added.

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