When you crave for a simple 'chee cheong fun' meal with a selection of 'yong tau foo' or 'yong liew'. — Pictures by Lee Khang Yi
When you crave for a simple ‘chee cheong fun’ meal with a selection of ‘yong tau foo’ or ‘yong liew’. — Pictures by Lee Khang Yi

PETALING JAYA, May 21 — There are a lot of chee cheong fun sellers on various Facebook groups but somehow my cravings and their order times have not matched. I decided the best thing was to just order from a restaurant like Ipoh Sedap in SS2, PJ.

Following my friend’s recommendation, I ordered their chee cheong fun for RM5.80. All I needed was just the plain smooth rice rolls doused in soy sauce and oil with pickled green chillies on the side.

It’s satisfying as the rolls are soft indicating the use of rice flour versus a mix with tapioca flour that produces a bouncier texture.

They also give you the red sauce, chilli sauce and a curry sauce, should you wish to jazz it up. They also do a dried prawns version, so ask for that to punch up the flavours if you prefer.

I enjoyed it with a selection of their yong tau foo (in Perak, it’s known as yong liew). High on the list are the beef tendon balls. It has a chunkier bite but one can detect it has a bit more flour nowadays.

There is also the sar kok liew or a yam bean fritter. I often feel it’s like an Asian hashbrown with its crispy beancurd skin surrounding the sweet, shredded yam bean. Both items are unique to Perak.

The Hakka mee comes with minced meat and makes for a satisfying meal (left). You can order the fried items like the 'sar kok liew', a yam bean fritter unique to Perak together with stuffed brinjal and bitter gourd (right).
The Hakka mee comes with minced meat and makes for a satisfying meal (left). You can order the fried items like the ‘sar kok liew’, a yam bean fritter unique to Perak together with stuffed brinjal and bitter gourd (right).

They also have the usual items like brinjal, smooth white beancurd, lady’s fingers and bitter gourd. The filling of chopped fish paste has a softer, fluffier texture, making it a pleasant bite. The small pieces are priced at RM1 while the larger items are RM1.50.

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You can also order various types of noodles here. If you want a cleaner tasting meal, look for the hor hee noodles (RM7.80) that are served with fish cake slices, fishballs and fish skin wantan. The broth has a slight sweet taste.

There’s also curry noodles you can enjoy two ways, with the curry or the dry version. I am partial to the dry version (RM8.80 for a small order) but it doesn’t work so well for takeaway though as the noodles clump together.

If you prefer a simple meal, try the clear broth 'hor hee' noodles that is served with fish cake slices, fish skin wantan and fishball (left). The dry curry chicken noodle may not look attractive but it is delicious (right).
If you prefer a simple meal, try the clear broth ‘hor hee’ noodles that is served with fish cake slices, fish skin wantan and fishball (left). The dry curry chicken noodle may not look attractive but it is delicious (right).

I added a bit of curry sauce from my chee cheong fun to loosen the strands. You get a generous portion of chicken pieces and potatoes in the mild tasting curry.

Then there’s the Hakka mee for RM5.80. I love the springy texture of the noodles with the minced meat. It does clump a little as it cools down but it’s manageable with a little patience so pair it with the yong liew that comes with soup.

Last but not least, look for their fragrant biscuits or heong peng. I actually frequent this shop just for this. They get the biscuits delivered from Ipoh a few times a week, depending on how fast they run out.

Your takeaway or food delivery will be in various packets for the soup and noodles, while the 'yong tau foo' is separated in soup and deep fried items in a brown bag.
Your takeaway or food delivery will be in various packets for the soup and noodles, while the ‘yong tau foo’ is separated in soup and deep fried items in a brown bag.

Just ask when the shipment comes in as the fresh biscuits are so worth the effort. It’s a family favourite and we must always have a packet of them at home. You get flaky layers with a toasted top mixed with a gooey sugar syrup that is not overly sweet. Simply addictive.

Ipoh Sedap, 94, Jalan SS2/60, Petaling Jaya. Open: 7.30am to 6.30pm. You can call 016-5679591 or WhatsApp them for self pick-up or arrange for delivery at your own cost. They also have dine-in service now. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/食好料Ss2-ipoh-sedap-541663166013454/

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