Tue, 2021-02-16 18:18

DUBAI: Warner Music Group (WMG) on Tuesday announced it has invested an undisclosed amount in Rotana Music, the independent record label owned by Saudi Arabia’s Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal.

The deal will boost WMG’s presence in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and includes an agreement for ADA Worldwide, its label services division, to distribute Rotana releases globally outside the region.

“We’re thrilled to be joining with Rotana, whose significant presence in the market reflects its extraordinary roster of musical icons and outstanding talent,” said WMG’s President, International, Recorded Music Simon Robson.

“We’re especially excited about the opportunity to both expand our profile in the region and to bring these amazing artists to audiences across the globe.” 

Salem Al-Hendi, CEO of Rotana Music Holding, said: “This is an exciting time, and we at Rotana are very happy with this partnership, which will facilitate Warner Music’s reach into the MENA music industry and fan communities, just as it will benefit Rotana in our global expansion objective.”

Rotana’s portfolio of Arab artists includes Mohamad Abdo, Abdulmajid Abdallah, Rabeh Saqer, Rashed Al-Majed, Abdallah Ruwaished, Ahlam, Amr Diab, Elissa, Tamer Hosny, Najwa Karam, Shereen Abdalwahab, Angham, Wael Kfoury and Saber Al-Robae.

Established in 1993, Rotana Music Holding is the largest record label in the Arab world. Headquartered in Riyadh, it has offices in Jeddah, Dubai, Kuwait, Lebanon and Cairo.

Salem Al-Hendi, CEO of Rotana Music Holding. (Supplied)
WMG’s President, International, Recorded Music Simon Robson (left) and Rotana Music Holding CEO Salem Al-Hendi. (Supplied)
Warner Music Group on Tuesday announced it has invested an undisclosed amount in Rotana Music, the independent record label owned by Saudi Arabia’s Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal. (Supplied)
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